Stories


Get on the Jet: Traveling Within Europe
Nadja Sayej
2011-04-01

It’s easy to get around Europe once you’re here. Everything is so close by and easy to get to. Rarely will it take you more than one or two hours to get to your chosen destination from anywhere in Europe, especially from Germany.

Since landing in Berlin from Toronto a few months back, I have traveled to Norway, Italy, Latvia, Finland, and more, to interview artists abroad for my web-TV show, ArtStars*. Here is how I have managed to visit all these amazing places on simply a dime.

 RYANAIR
Where to? Berlin-Oslo
How long? One and a half hours
How much? 25€
My experience: Ryanair is a small, intra-European airlines based out of Ireland. It is super popular with students and underpaid writers. This is where – if you book ahead – you can get flights as cheap as 10€. It is after all called the “low fares airline.” And for the most part, that’s true. The only problem is getting to the main city from the remote airports set way out of the way. Just be prepared to pay for a train or bus ride to the city core of whichever city you travel to, and 15€ for each check-in luggage each way.
Rating: 6/10
Website: ryanair.com

 

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 AIR BERLIN
Where to? Berlin-Rome
How long? One hour
How much? 45€
My experience: Air Berlin will get you to and fro most European destinations – they cover all the key hotspots. Flying straight out of Berlin’s inner-city Tegel airport, you can get to Venice, Amsterdam or Stockholm in just a matter of hours. The food was great, the staff was friendly, and upon departing the plane, they hand out heart-shaped chocolates wrapped in red tinfoil (and it wasn’t even Valentines Day).
Rating: 8/10
Website: www.airberlin.com

 AIR BALTIC
Where to?
Berlin-Riga
How long? Two hours
How much? 98€
My experience: If you want to get out to the Baltic countries in northern Europe, this is the best way to go. The food is great, so is the service, and if you need any adjustments to your itinerary, the staff are more than willing to help out in English – so is their website, by default. Comfy, cozy and elegant, I walked up the stairs of the small plane, like something out of a 1950s film. The only thing missing were my Jackie O sunglasses. Flying business class here, you’ll get the supreme treatment – but don’t forget to visit the business lounge at the Riga Airport. That’s where the best secrets are kept.
Rating: 9/10
Website: airbaltic.com

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AIR FRANCE
Where to? Berlin-Paris
How long? One and a half hour
How much? Anywhere around 89€
My experience: Air France was an exceptionally professional and punctual airline that got me to the heart of Paris – the Charles de Gaulle airport – in no time. Quick, easy and painless, the wait staff was kind and friendly. The plane blasted pop music upon takeoff and the pilot waved everyone off the plane once we landed softly. The food is also spectacular. Attached is a photo of their chicken couscous served in economy.
Rating: 8/10
Website: www.airfrance.com

  

 

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NADJA SAYEJ, host of ArtStars*, writes about art for artUS, Border Crossings, C magazine, Canadian Art, the Globe and Mail, the New York Times and was splashed the cover of Eye Weekly as “the next Jeanne Beker.” She was called “Center Stage in Toronto in an Art in America cover story. She is a columnist for enRoute and is busting her ass in Berlin, Germany, and surrounding countries. Follow the adventurous fun on Twitter or her ever-popular Facebook fanpage or even on LinkedIn, as well. artstarstv.com_250px.jpg

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My experience in Germany has been invaluable. In addition to learning German and taking part in another culture, I have learned so much about myself. I am confident that I can thrive away from the comforts of home and that I am dynamic and flexible. This is exactly what today’s employers are looking for – giving me a competitive advantage in the working world.
Kate from British Columbia – working for an international not-for-profit organisation.